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Children Deserve New Approach to Education

The ability to imagine, create, and inspire requires individuals who are balanced, have high self-esteem, able to problem solve, work independently and within teams, and utilize their unique strengths to find purpose in their careers, says guest columnist Dr. Wendy Hirsh Weiner, founder of the Conservatory Prep Senior High School in Davie, Florida.

Challenging Marriage Educators to Prove Impact

As the annual SmartMarriages conference begins in Orlando, a Psychology Today article takes aim at proponents of marriage education for focusing on selling classes instead of research. Ensuring marriage education programs have a proven track record of positive impact is vital to gaining trust and broader acceptance from the public and professionals.

Bonding critical for adoptive parents and children

As he celebrated his eighth birthday in a Moscow hospital this week, little Artyom Savelyev’s experiences continued to betray the hope of his Russian name, to be “safe and sound.” Artyom’s story and many others demonstrate the importance of improving post-adoption services through skills that enhance communication, emotional understanding, promote forgiveness, bonding, attachment, and healthy conflict resolution.

Study offers hope for marriages, families, and jobs

A study by the nonprofit PAIRS Foundation found statistically significant, lasting improvements in marital satisfaction for men and women who completed a nine-hour relationship skills training program. The organization says that expanding relationship skills training in communities nationwide offers the potential for creating tens of thousands of jobs while reducing billions in taxpayer expenses.

Parents key to reducing teen-on-teen violence

Rarely is violence against children as premeditated as the attack that left 15 dead and 24 injured at Columbine High School. More typically, it’s a result of young people without constructive, healthy outlets for upsetting feelings either unleashing stored up emotions inward or outward. Parental messages that urge children not to feel what they feel (“Don’t be angry,” “Don’t be sad,” Don’t be scared.”) often lead youngsters to stop confiding in trusted adults, giving more energy to bottled up feelings that can become destructive. Assuring more children grow up with two parents who are actively engaged in their lives within neighborhoods where caring adults are regularly a positive influence is the most important contribution we can make to a future that’s safer for all of our sons and daughters.