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Good news for helping police strengthen marriages

Law enforcement, military and others involved in protecting America’s neighborhoods, security, and borders learn powerful skills to be effective in their careers. Sadly, those same skills that enable many to keep our nation’s homes, families and children safe too often cause these professionals to lose their own. For children especially, the price of that sacrifice may be paid over the course of their lives. The good news is that it doesn’t have to be that way. With a fraction of the effort and time it takes to develop skills to succeed in protecting our communities and nation, police officers, soldiers and others involved in security fields can learn practical skills and strategies for succeeding as husbands, wives, fathers and mothers.

Parents key to reducing teen-on-teen violence

Rarely is violence against children as premeditated as the attack that left 15 dead and 24 injured at Columbine High School. More typically, it’s a result of young people without constructive, healthy outlets for upsetting feelings either unleashing stored up emotions inward or outward. Parental messages that urge children not to feel what they feel (“Don’t be angry,” “Don’t be sad,” Don’t be scared.”) often lead youngsters to stop confiding in trusted adults, giving more energy to bottled up feelings that can become destructive. Assuring more children grow up with two parents who are actively engaged in their lives within neighborhoods where caring adults are regularly a positive influence is the most important contribution we can make to a future that’s safer for all of our sons and daughters.

Questions to ask a potential marriage therapist

Going to a marriage therapist may be one of the worst decisions a couple can make for their relationship. For many, it’s the beginning of an expensive, time-consuming journey that often contributes to divorce. Through incompetence, neutrality, pathologizing, and undermining relationships, therapists can actually harm marriages and lead couples rapidly down the road to divorce. Consider asking these important questions before deciding if marriage therapy is right for you. As an alternative to marriage therapy, many couples have found marriage education far more effective.

Jerry Seinfeld’s The Marriage Ref Normalizes Relationship Differences

With weekly episodes beginning Thursday in Jay Leno’s previous 10:00pm time slot, The Marriage Ref’s celebrity panelists such as Madonna, Tina Fey, Eva Longoria Parker, and Larry David are sure to bring a valuable message to millions of couples: differences are a normal part of every relationship. Learning to deal with them with humor, empathy, respect and structure is a message that can make a difference for countless marriages and help couples become their own marriage refs.

PAIRS DTR App Keeps Couples, Families, and Friends Connected through iPhone and Facebook

PAIRS DTR, a free iPhone app available today from iTunes, helps couples, families, parents, and friends strengthen relationships. Developed by the nonprofit PAIRS Foundation, a leader in relationship skills training, PAIRS DTR for iPhone, iPod touch, and iPad guides users through a practical, five-step communication exercise that can be posted on Facebook or shared by e-mail.

Life lessons for a visionary team

PAIRS team members meet weekly to share Appreciations, New Information, Puzzles, Concerns with Recommendations, and Wishes, Hopes and Dreams. This week, Sanford Rosenthal helped the team learn valuable life lessons that deepened our appreciation for our own resources and abilities and helped us better understand the challenges people with disabilities face daily.

Vital resources to reducing teen pregnancy

While there is no one size fits all approach to reducing teen pregnancy, educational programs that focus on helping youngsters better express themselves through conversations with trusted confidants offer much promise. That’s especially so when confidants are parents and other significant adults who are able to model healthy relationship building skills.

Step Back from the Brink of Divorce

If any of these 12 statements sound familiar, discover how relationship skills training can help you step back from the brink of family breakdown and divorce to save your marriage and family: “I can never forgive you,” “I can’t talk to you,” “I just don’t love you anymore,” “I never really loved you,” “I’ll never be happy in this relationship,” I’m in love with someone else,” “I’m so angry at you,” “It’s too late,” “There’s no chemistry,” “You betrayed me,” “You’re not the person I married,” “You’ll never change.”

Children Learn What They Live

The understanding that children learn enduring life lessons much more from the actions of their parents, as opposed to their words (especially when their words and actions don’t match), has inspired generations of mothers and fathers to learn the skills and create environments that offer their children the greatest opportunity for happiness, fulfillment, and success.

If Only Tiger Would

While few beyond Tiger Woods and his wife likely will (or should) ever know the full truth to the claims now widely circulated in both the tabloid and popular press, it’s all too understandable how public icons can be led horribly astray, apparently blinding themselves in the process to the eventual price they’ll almost certainly pay. For those who are most accomplished and recognized, the decisions they make are often much more about a hunger for validation than a yearning for sex. Marriage education founded on emotional literacy is an important solution.

Making the Most of Holiday Family Time

Fort Lauderdale, FL (PRWEB) November 18, 2009 — PAIRS Foundation is offering a series of free one-hour webinars to help families learn five steps for creating joyful holidays and family celebrations. “Holidays can be a time of wonderful celebration, sharing and connection,” says Seth Eisenberg, PAIRS Foundation’s President and CEO. […]